Can You Powerslide With Soft Wheels | Read Details About Powersliding Wheels

If your skateboard bears soft skate wheels and you’re planning to powerslide with it, think twice. Why?

Read out this article to know the reasons why you shouldn’t be trying powerslide on soft wheels.

In this article, we will not only reveal why you can’t powerslide on soft wheels but will also discuss the features of skateboard soft wheels.

Moreover, if you’re feeling curious to know why the wheel type is important for power sliding and which type of wheels are best for it, you’ll find that here as well.

Consequently, you will find out that skateboard wheels for powerslide requires unique & particular characteristics and features which softer wheels doesn’t offer.

So, without further ado,

Just read it out!

Role of Wheels in Powersliding

First thing first, let’s clarify what powerslide actually refers to. Powerslide is a braking trick done by many intermediate-level skaters, downhill skaters, and street riders who are fond of higher speeds and bombing hills.

In this technique, the rider puts just the right amount of force to make the wheels stop spinning and instead glide with a 90-degree rotation across the road or riding surface. All the wheels remain in contact with the ground while powersliding and it requires a good amount of speed.

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Role of Wheels
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A perfect powersliding depends on several factors, which include, speed, the position of the skater’s legs, the skater’s body posture, the type of road skating on, and the type of wheels of the skateboard.

Here, the type of skateboard wheels plays a very crucial role in powersliding. Because the type and hardness of the wheel determine whether the skateboard will glide smoothly without any restriction on the surface of the road or not.

Bearings are also an important factor. A bearing compatible for street skating or sliding tend to roll smoothly and clearly.

Why You Can’t Powerslide on Softer Wheels

The harder the skateboard wheels are, the smoother the powerslide will be. Here’s why soft wheels have a better grip and resistance on the road surface which obstructs a smooth glide.

Whereas, harder wheels have less grip, so they glide just like butter on the road surface.

Soft Wheels For Powersliding
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That is why a hard wheel is the best option for powerslide. But it is also not like you absolutely cannot powerslide on softer wheels. You can, but not as smoothly and efficiently as it can be done with a hard wheel.

Skateboard Softer Wheel Features

If you’re wondering whether your skateboard wheels are soft or not, then check out the features that categorize a skateboard into soft and clear out your confusion.

Skateboard Wheels Features
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The features that are required to figure out the hardness of the skateboard wheels are listed below.

Durometer

The primary and most important scale for measuring wheels hardness is the durometer. Skateboard wheels having a durometer of 78a-87a are considered softer wheels. They bear a strong grip.

Diameter

skateboard wheels are a bit bigger in size than the harder ones. The diameter of a wheel refers to the length of the two circular sides of the wheel passing through the center.

Generally, the diameter of soft skateboard wheels is within 54 to 60 mm.

Contact Patch

Contact patch indicates the part of the wheel that rolls on the surface of skating. Be it a soft wheel or hard, a narrow contact patch slides way smoother than a wider one.

And so, you need to check if the contact patch of your wheel is narrow enough for performing a powerslide smoothly.

Conclusion

If you’re planning to try powersliding with your skateboard, do check that your skateboard wheels aren’t soft. If they’re so, you will never get the real ease of powersliding from it. So, we will recommend you to try powersliding only on harder wheels.

If you don’t have harder wheels, you can always buy some better would be buying spitfire harder wheels. And if you’re not willing to buy, then drop the idea of powerslide and try some other skateboard braking technique that suits soft wheels instead.

That’s it!

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